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honorary degrees, she's been the first of everything, ran the national science foundation, she was the -- >> nuclear regulatory commission. >> nuclear regulatory commission. and she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at mit. amazing. [applause] nancy-ann deparle is assistant to the president and the deputy chief of staff for the executive office of the white house. she's an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she's been called the health czar of america, the point guard overhauling the american health care system. how about that for a job? >> there you go. >> what a powerhouse right here. [applause] so we, actually, have a lot of brain power up here right now. [laughter] and i wonder, all of you could have done very different things. you really had a lot of choices. so i'd just love to hear you about how you ended up picking what you did. who wants to start? >> you have the -- >> no. >> i'm a failed violinist. of laugh -- [laughter] i was raised to be a musician, and my mother still asks me what happened. [laughter] but i was always interested in p
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where you don't back down from a challenge. this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. >>> just reading some of your tweets here about who i will predict will win the massachusetts senate rate. afleck, another one here. dave is not there 33 tweeted and then changed his mind to matt damon. ashley judd. no, i'm not going to predict that. but i hope
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
rate of spding were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking forereign language] eart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... announcer: this song was s created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio.. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i wod show youwhat thuld happen if wechange into the speaker boehner plan,
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. avoid bad.fats. don't go over 2000... 1200 calories a day. carbs are bad. carbs are good. the story keeps changing. so i'm not listening... to anyone but myself. i know better nutrition when i see it: great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more processed flakes look nothing like naturalrains. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. for multi grain flakes tt are anxcellent source of fiber try great grains banana nut crunch and cranberry almond crunch. >> bret: this is a fox news alert. live in washington. bret baier live in washington. you can tell it is getting a little late after a long day of covering fiscal cliff coverage here as the deal appears to be heading in the right direction. although vice president biden is meeting with senate democrats and has been for the last hour and a half trying to twist arms and possibly get votes as a piece o
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront." is chuck hagel's nomination dead on arrival? now hagel, the former republican senator and vietnam war hero, could be president obama's choice to be the next defense secretary. but today he's under attack by a group of gay republicans known as the log cabin republicans. now, this full-page ad said hagel's wrong for the job because of a statement he made back in 1998, when he questioned whether, in his words, a quote, openly, aggressively gay nominee could be an effective u.s. ambassador. now, a lot's changed since then, and hagel has since apologized, though that has also come under attack for his somewhat controversial beliefs on israel, iraq, and iran. are these attacks justified, or is he just the latest political target in an ugly game of gotcha politics. "outfront" tonight, our all-star panel. ryan, let me start with you. let's look at chuck hagel's credentials. a vietnam war veteran, two purple hearts,
on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> i am at m shapiro. wholesales rose it of members to the highest level more than two years. sales were up 15% from the same time last year. mortgage rates finished out but the average for the 30 year fixed average was up three point* 3%. after four years on the job the epa's administrator jackson is resigning expecting to leave after the "state of the union" address in january. sea world entertainment filing for the ipo coming three years after the orlando based operator was acquired by blackstone group at 2.5 billion dollars. they purchased them from anheuser-busch and as. this is the latest from fox business, giving you the power to prosper. >> russia hosting peace talks to end the civil unrest over 20 months. will they encourage president aside to step down? let's go to our correspondent from jerusalem. >> so far the russians have said they will not encourage aside to step down but it must be solved from dialogue. and he said he felt syria could go into a bloody mess but some fe
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
of orphaned elephants. our contributing science correspondent m. san jay of the nature conservancy has found a woman who has devoted her entire life helping them at an elephant sanctuary in kenya. >> reporter: these orphaned elephants are getting a second chance at life thanks to their foster mother named daphne sheldrick. >> we tried to replicate what that baby elephant would have in the wild. the most important thing being a family. >> reporter: sheldrick has lived among elephants nearly 60 years and started the orphanage in the 1970s when killing elephants for their tusks became an international crisis. over the years, she's discovered elephants share many traits with humans. a long life span, mourning of their dead and strong family bonds. that's led to new technique for raising elephants in captivity. >> we have a team of keepers that represent the elephant family that they've lost. and here in the nursery, the keepers or attendants are with the orphans 24 hours a day because the baby elephants in a natural situation would never ever be left on its own. all the family care for that baby
entrepreneur with a science degree or engineering degree and you graduate from mit. you want to start a high-tech company. would you started in the united states, where you're getting from your company years down the road will be taxed at 30%, or would you started in china or india where the capital gains tax rate is zero? many of our major partners have zero capital gains tax rates. if you are an entrepreneur or an investment and growth company, you would rather put your money there than in the united states in the future, which is really unfortunate. gerri: okay, let's talk about companies a little bit here. these tax rates are critical to growing companies. >> that's absoluty right. apple and microsoft, for example, benefited early on from high income individuals pumping and a few hundred thousand dollars to help those companies get started and grow. those high income people could alternatively put their money in and say tax-free muni bonds. if we raise the capital gains tax rates, which people are going to say, i'd ther put my money in state muni bonds. i'm not i am not going to fund the
math metically, where science ends, the part that makes you feel good but you don't know why, the way the object feels and looks and you can almost if it's perfectly created explain it to somebody else afterwards but in the creation part you can't. you can see how the glass is constantly moving. my job is to basically shape it. and balance it at the same time. you do that, you get these wonderful shapes, glass really rewards the risk. lot of times with glass you're waiting for the piece to cool down and temperature to adjust and split seconds where you've got a fraction of a second to make a particular move in a particular way and you don't get to repeat it if could you it wrong so there's a performance to it. it's sort of like dancing. you can't really think about it and do it really. you just have to do it enough that it becomes sort of mechanical, and then you can sort of free your mind to design. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a member of the paparazzi is de
prognosis for the future? dr. lee from lsu health sciences center. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> what are the potential implications for the blood clot, where it is located and how are you reading it? >> well, i mean, it is hard without seeing the patient, but truthfully -- potentially it can be very dangerous. now, it is extremely rare to have this kind of clot in the vein after a mild concussion. if you don't have something like a skull fracture that tears some of the membranes there, but this type of clot is related to other conditions. if you have blood disorders where your blood clots too readily, you can sometimes get it if you have infection, and postpartum, it is common in women in the postpartum period. and then the clot itself can cause a back up of blood and can lead to damage of the brain and sort of like a little stroke in that area. but her doctors are reporting she doesn't have any symptoms like a stroke. they seem to think they caught it early, and they are giving her medicines to stop the clotting anti-coagulation. that takes a couple days to regulate that. >
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
a concussion suffered in a fall several weeks ago. joining me now, nbc's chief science and health correspondence, bob bazell. and also with me "the washington post" ruth marcus. first to you, where this clot was found, a follow-up mri we were told on sunday night, and we were told it was a clot stemming from the concussion from the fall. does that mean that the clot was necessarily caused by the concussion or could it be from an underlying condition, or is there no way to really know that fact? >> it may have been caused by both of those problems. sometimes there's sort of a perfect storm of issues going on with any individual patient, with potential histories of history of blood clots in the past, as well as head trauma. this can increase the risk of getting a blood clot in that part of the brain. >> let me ask you also about how potentially dangerous this is. we know that this is near the brain, not in the brain, it is in the area between the skull and the brain. it is behind the right ear, we're told. we don't know a whole lot more. we are told today the secretary is on with he
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. thresh . >>> you're watching "msnbc." and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world you'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualizes your sleep. the only place you'll find the sleep number bed. a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. and the only place you'll find the sleep number year-end event. save 50% on the final closeout of our silver limited edition bed. plus, through new year's day, special financing on selected beds. in the name of human individuality: the sleep number collection. and the sleep number year-end event. exclusively at one of our 400 sleep number stores nationwide, where queen mattresses start at just $699. sleep number. comfort individualized. >>> welcome back to "msnbc"'s breaking news coverage of the fiscal deal reached on capitol hill. o
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town, for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. >> when the president has to quote yogi berra, you know it's tough. that was president obama lamenting the state of affairs in washington, d.c. indeed, today's congress is on track to go down as the least productive congress since recordkeeping began. the 112th congress will come to a merciful end in early january. it has passed 219 bills that have actually been signed into law by president obama, according to the "huffington post". 219 bills. many of them insignificant measures like naming post offices. speaker john boehner's congress is about to take the prize for inaction. this is not a bipartisan problem. as stated by both liberal and conservative analysts, "we have been studying washington politics and congress for more than 40 years, and never have we seen the
. joining us now with more is nbc's chief science and health correspondent, bob bozel. bob, thank you very much for being here. >> my pleasure, joy. >> can you give us an update on secretary clinton's condition? >> doing very well, responding perfectly to treatment, nbc's cameras captured a picture of bill clinton's car leaving the hospital. didn't see bill clinton in it, but it seems to indicate the family is continuing to visit regularly, which we've known all along. all the neurologists i've spoken to says the treatments for this very rare concussion, here we see what it is, it's a blockage in a vein that drains blood from the brain and takes it to the rest of the body. if that blockage isn't cleared away, it can back up and put liquid into the skull, which could cause a stroke. that's the reason it has to be dissolved. it's dissolved with blood thinners, first as an i.v. drip, then on to pills. it's not a typical course, many doctors tell me, so no indication to doubt the reports she's doing just fine. >> this was not a stroke, that's important to emphasize, but the treatment is to pre
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> i feel really very, very good about how this vote is going to go, but having been in the senate as long as i have, there are two things you shouldn't do. you shouldn't predict how the senate is going to vote before they vote. you won't make a lot of money. and number two, you surely shouldn't predict how the house will vote. but i feel very good. i think we'll get a very good vote tonight. happy new year, and i will see you all maybe tomorrow. >> vice president joe biden on capitol hill just minutes ago after coming out of a meeting with senate democrats. he met with them for a while, trying to convince the naysayers in his o
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline to the fiscal cliff draws to within hours. unless aan agreement a
card companies do. this isn't rocket science. when the red flag goes up, don't pay until you verify. if they do that, we will save tens of billions of dollars and put more money back into medicare which will make it more solvent. gerri: well, you know, goodness sakes. you're suggesting we adopt private sector ideas to a public sector system? senator, thanks for coming on tonight. a pleasure to talk to you. got to come back soon. appreciate your time. >> thanks so much, enjoyed being on. gerri: thank you. coming up, we go to the l.a. auto show and we'll tell you the hottest trend in all things cars. we look ahead to 2013. what could be the next big stress to the financial system. why nobody is talking about it, we will next. dry mouth may start off as an irritant. it'll cause cavities, bad breath. but if you're not drinking it, it's going to get dry again. i recommend biotene. all the biotene products like the oral rinse...the sprays have enzymes in them. the whole formulation just works very well. it leaves the mouth feeling fresh. if i'm happy with the results and my patients are h
york presbyterian nbc's chief science and health correspondent robert bazell. what do we know this morning, bob? >> reporter: well, chris, since we've been talking about this last night we don't have a lot of information. we just have this one statement from secretary clinton's office and the hospital is not saying anything. a lot of doctors are telling me the information in that statement is a bit contradictory. here's why. they say that she has a blood clot that stemmed from a concussion she got several weeks ago. but the problem is, blood clots that stem from concussions don't usually get treated with blood thinning drugs which is what they say they're doing here. either she has a concussion someplace else that may not -- excuse me -- a blood clot someplace else that may not be related to the concussion or there is more to her health that we don't know about. they say they're watching her closely for a couple days. we will have to continue to watch ourselves to see what the situation is but right now all we know is that she is in this hospital. she's under observation. we d
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. red jars are all the same right? wrong! you need three uses of a $15 cream to equal the moisturizing power of one use of regenerist microsculpting cream. seems not all red jars are created equal. olay regenerist. >>> back with our roundtable discussion on the fiscal cliff and your money. ron brownstein is cnn's political analyst and editorial director of the national journey. stephen moore, senior economics writer at the "wall street journal" and necessary washington. joining must new york is todd showen berger from land capital. we showed a poll most americans want people to compromise. no purr surprise there why can't republicans and democrats get their act together and compromise? >> well, i think this previous discussion we were just having is kind of an example of what's happening in congress is, you know, democrats, liberal democrats really believe that taxes don't matter around they can continue to raise them as high as they want. i happen to think they are critically important. i think
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> we're following two breaking news stories this hour. we now know the united states will in fact go over the fiscal cliff at midnight tonight. the senate is closing in on a deal, but the house has said it will not vote tonight. possibly take up any action tomorrow. the other breaking news story we're following, new details emerging of secretary of state hillary clinton's blood clot. doctors are now revealing it's located in a vein between her brain and her skull. they say it did not result in a stroke or any neurological damage. we're following both of these stories. i want to bring in tom foreman on the fiscal cliff. the emerging deal that's out there, no deal yet, and no deal until it's finalized, not only in the senate, as you know, tom, but the house of representatives and signed into law by the president. >> there's so many contentious details here. any one of them might trip this up, but there are two big pillars we're talking about today more than anything else. the first one seems to have been suc
were checking her recovery from a concussion. robert bazell is nbc's chief science and health correspondent. he's at new york presbyterian hospital. bob, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, chris, we can tell you that it's not exactly clear what is happening with secretary clinton's health. all we have is a statement from her office. the hospital isn't saying anything and the the hospital says that she had this blood clot that stemmed from the concussion and she's being treated with blood-thinning drugs. the problem is that usually when blood clots come from concussions, they can't be treated with blood clots. so, either it's not really related to the concussion and she's got a blood clot in her leg or something, or there's something else going on that we're not being told. and right now, we're just sort of seeking that clarification and hoping for the best as she's being observed, as they say, for the next couple of weeks -- excuse me, for the next couple days, to make sure she's okay. chris? >> bob bazell, thank you for the time. >>> the opening bell just rang on wall s
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant smoke? nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secreta secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. sure. decaf or regular? regular. cake or pie? pie. apple or cherry? cherry. ♪ oil or cream? oil or cream? cream. [ male announcer ] with reddi-wip, a slice of pie never sounded better. that's because it's always made with real cream, never hydrogenated oil like some other whipped toppings. the sound of reddi-wip is the sound of joy. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. comfort indi
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